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Mike Ghouse

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Muslim, Buddhist and Government perspectives of ISIS in Iraq

With Permission from Boothe Global Perspective.
Thank you Ben for sharing the message with your world wide audience, we appreciate that.

by Boothe Global Perspectives, Special | ‎Wednesday, August 20, 2014, 8:44 AM (CDT)

https://bootheglobalperspectives.com/article/1408542245WBG487492234/muslim-buddhist-and-government-perspective-of-isis-in-iraq

  THREE GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES TO ISIS AND OTHER RELIGIOUS/POLITICAL CONFLICTS IN THE WORLD

 This article outlines three unique and powerful global perspectives all from sources with voice and influence on millions, to terrorism and the absolute horribly evil actions taking place around the world.  Of course, the terror, (bombings of civilians, kidnapping of children, raping of wives, beheading of children, execution of civilian men while they watch their wives and children being herded off to rape and execution),  are in the playbook of immoral people from time immortal. The terror they conduct is supposed to frighten people into submission. 

But, more and more people around the world have learned that these acts of violence have lost their ability to frighten…because to be intimidated is to fall within the power of immoral terrorists.  More and more people just see these acts for what they are, disgusting, pathetic, evil tools by ambitious men, who would use their religion, their guns, their knives, even their bodies to desecrate and demean humanity and themselves, in the goal of power, greed, ego and politics.  We see it in the Ukraine (Russia, a Christian nation fighting Ukrainians),  Israel (A Jewish nation bombing Gaza), Gaza (Muslims sending rockets to blast Israel), Iraq (the self proclaimed Islamic State attacking religious minorities, and other Muslims), Nigeria (thugs posing as Muslims kidnapping children, murdering their parents).   These are people doing evil things. 

 More and more people around the world are adding their voices and energy condemning the evil acts done by men under a pretense of religion. Most of the time it is politics, power, greed and control...not spirituality, and certainly not what any major religion would espouse. 
1. Mike Ghouse, Islamic leader, has an audience of 6,000,000 people and he has called for good Islamic people to pray for an end to the violence and call for an end to the leaders of ISIS (ISIL) for their wicked acts. His study of Islam, says what ISIS is doing, has no justification to call their evil acts “religious”, indeed what they do is evil by their own holy book.   
2. HH the Dalai Lama, Buddhist leader, who speaks to millions throughout the world, has met with Islamic leaders in India and they have also condemned the acts of ISIS (ISIL) and restated that the Koran speaks against such evil violent acts (thus, showing that ISIL cannot in truth call what they do religious).  
3. Finally we see a response from a government. This photograph, of a bombed and destroyed Toyota Pick Up.  ISIS had a host of brand new Toyota Pickups, all equipped with powerful weaponry in the bed of the truck that they proudly drove from Syria into Iraq to conduct their lightning fast shock raids.  The photo shows their ultimate destination, one must wonder if these sad burned Toyota tombs represent trips to heaven, or just a fiery end to evil adventurism…it is the voice of justice and power, with no pretense of religion or terrorism. Simply a message of the ultimate destiny of men, who died hiding under a tree, after doing wicked things.

 1. PERSPECTIVE FROM MUSLIMS, MIKE GHOUSE, WORLD MUSLIM CONFERENCE (6,000,000 people follow Mike)

Muslims to dedicate Friday Sermons for the safety of Christians, Yazidis, Shia and other Minorities, and condemn Terrorist Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi to prevent the Genocide Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi is on a killing spree of Christians, Yazidis, Shia and other Minorities in Iraq and Syria. We urge Muslims to pray for Sanity to prevail, and urge the World powers to give a final warning to Al-Baghdadi to surrender or face the drones. 

In behalf of Muslims, I strongly condemn the evil acts of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi for terrorizing Christians, Yazidis, Shia and other minorities in Iraq. He is an evil man and must be caught and processed for his crimes against humanity, there is Genocide in making, and I recommend a bounty be posted to get him dead or alive.
Key suggestions:

1. We urge Muslims around the world to dedicate their congregational Sermon on Friday, August 15, 2014 and or August 22, 2014 for the safety of Christians, Yazidis, Shia and others in Iraq and Syria, and restore law and order, and safety to the victims of oppression. 
2. Christians are fleeing Iraq, and their population is dwindling from a Million down to 400,000, it needs to be stopped at once. No human should be thrown and forced out of his or her home, and thanks to the US initiative to rescue the Yazidis. 
3. The Gang leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi has given a despicable ultimatum to the Christians, "We offer them three choices: Islam; the dhimma contract - involving payment of Jiziyah; if they refuse this they will have nothing but the sword."
4. No one should have the right to chase any one out of their own homes. Quran recommends severe punishment to the oppressors and suggests hunting them down where ever they can be found and punish them accordingly, unless they sincerely repent and back off. It's time to apply the Quranic rule to these criminals. 
5. We urge the European Union to drone the terrorists individually without hurting the innocent civilians to prevent Genocide. The United States does not have a moral ground to stand on, as we have justified bombing civilians in the Gaza crisis, shame on us, our Senators and Congresspersons. 
6. The terrorists who call themselves religious and carry the labels of Islam, (ISIL or ISIS) have beheaded hundreds of innocent people, crucified former Muslims who freely chose to follow Jesus Christ, destroyed dozens of Christian churches, burned sacred manuscripts and sacred art, and sent hundreds of thousands of Christians and other religious minorities fleeing for their lives in a reign of bloodshed and terror (Catholic.org)
7. We urge the media to call them anything under the sun but caliph, Caliphate, or Islamic State. There is no need to give a semblance of legitimacy to Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi and his gang. We have to reject his evil claims of his acts as Islamic. Our attitude should be, "You are the murderer and not your religion, and you are going to pay a price for it, either surrender or face the drones".
8. If there were a certificate given to an organization to operate as an Islamic entity, Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi and his gang's application will be rejected for the gross violations of Islam, a few are addressed here;
a. There is no compulsion in Islam -- no one can be forced to believe against his or her will (2:256) -- how dare they make the despicable statement to the Christians of Iraq to convert or run.
b. Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)'s covenant states, "It is not permitted to remove a bishop from his bishopric or a Christian from his Christianity, a monk from his monastic life or a pilgrim from his pilgrimage or a hermit monk from his tower. Nor is it permitted to destroy any part of their churches, to take parts of their buildings to construct mosques or the homes of Muslims. Whoever does such a thing will have violated the pact of Allah, disobeyed his Messenger, and betrayed the Divine Alliance."
c. Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)'s covenant states, "No Christian will be made Muslim by force: And dispute ye not with the People of the Book, except with means better [29:46].
d. In another Hadith (Prophet's sayings) quoted by Abu Dawud, Prophet in essence says, if you are unjust to a Christian or a Jew, by God, on the Day of Judgment, I will stand up against you. Here is the quote, "Be aware, that whoever oppressed one who has a treaty with us, or belittled him, or burdened him with more than he is capable of, or took something from him forcibly with him being displeased, then I will be his plaintiff (will argue against him) on the Day of Judgment."

9. Please feel free to visit www.WorldMuslimCongress.com for updates and related reports on the subject.
To be a Muslim is to be a peace maker who seeks to mitigate conflicts and nurtures goodwill for peaceful co-existence of humanity. Our work at is geared towards building a cohesive society where no human has to live in apprehension or fear of the other. World Muslim congress is a think tank and a forum with the express goal of nurturing pluralistic values embedded in Islam to build cohesive societies. If we can learn to respect the otherness of others and accept each other's uniqueness, then conflicts fade and solutions emerge. Mike Ghouse is a Muslim Speaker thinker and a writer.
  Mike is a thoughtful, brave man, a powerful communicator and an outstanding organizer.  We at  Boothe Global Perspectives recommend that you follow Mike Ghouse and encourage his work. 

  2. HH the Dalia Lama, PERSPECTIVE (admired and followed by Buddhists throughout the World) 

Meeting Hosted with HH the Dalia Lama and by the Muslim Co-ordination Committee, Leh
 July 16th 2014
 Leh, Ladakh, J&K, India, 16 July 2014 -

The Muslim Co-ordination Committee, Leh had invited His Holiness to lunch. In welcoming remarks Saeed Naqvi praised His Holiness for his efforts to promote mutual understanding and for being a symbol of peace and harmony for the whole world. Saif ud din took up the theme saying:
“Today is a great day for us as we are honored by His Holiness’s presence. We admire your work for peace and assure you that Islam denounces violence and bloodshed. Like many in the international community we support your Middle Way Approach to resolving the difficulties in Tibet. We Muslims and Buddhists of Ladakh have long lived in harmony and will continue to do so. We pray for His Holiness’s long life and the fulfilment of his wishes.”
 “My Muslim spiritual brothers and sisters,” His Holiness replied, “you organized this meeting and invited me to it, which I greatly appreciate. In the small village where I was born near Kumbum Monastery there were Muslim families so I have long been familiar with people of Islam. When I reached Lhasa at the age of five, about 1000 Muslims lived there and whenever there were government functions Muslim representatives took part. Many of them wore a red hat with a tassle on it.”

 At mention of this the one man in the audience wearing such a hat got to his feet and His Holiness teased him saying:

 “Yes, just like that, with a tassle that matches you beard.

 “You may have heard me tell this story before, but the 13th Dalai Lama had had a pocket watch that I began to use. Then one day it stopped and we invited an expert Muslim watchmaker to come and have a look at it. He fixed it, but solemnly told me that a person who carries a watch in his pocket should behave as if he was carrying an egg! A gentle rebuke that I should be more careful.”

 His Holiness mentioned that after 1959 many Tibetan Muslims left Tibet and settled in Srinagar. For many years, he said he had been unable to visit them, but renewed his acquaintance two years ago. He spoke of being surprised and touched to discover that their young children spoke good Tibetan with a Lhasa dialect, an indication that they still use Tibetan within their families.

 In addition to describing his practice since 1975 of making pilgrimage to other people’s places of worship, which has seen him visit several mosques, making many Muslim friends, he referred to events since September 11th 2001. He recalled attending the first anniversary memorial service in Washington and expressing his conviction that just because the terrorists involved had a Muslim background was no reason for generalizing about a whole community. He pointed out that there are mischievous individuals amongst Hindus, Jews, Christians and Buddhists, not only among Muslims, and that to generalize about any of these communities on such a basis would be wrong and unfair. 

He said:
“I’m a Buddhist, but now I often step forward to defend Islam. I often repeat what my friend Farooq Abdhullah the former Chief Minister, explained to me about jihad, that it is not about attacking other people, but about making combat with your own disturbing emotions. If you are about to do someone harm, but you restrain yourself, that’s an instance of jihad, which also has a lot to do with self-discipline.”

His Holiness went on to praise India as a living example of tolerant pluralism, a place where all the world’s major religions live together peacefully side by side. He cited the small Parsee community in Mumbai who have long flourished there without fear. He reiterated that India’s example is a model for the world to follow.
 Commenting on the sadness he has felt to hear reports of Buddhists in Burma and Sri Lanka attacking Muslims, he recounted the appeal he had made to them when moved to attack to remember the face of the Buddha. His Holiness is convinced that if the Buddha were present there he would offer the victims protection. In a similar context, considering the conflicts between Sunnis and Shias in various parts of the Middle East and between Christians and Muslims in parts of Africa, he appealed to his listeners to consider ways in which they might influence their Muslim brothers to exercise restraint. He acknowledged that Ladakhi Muslims by themselves might not achieve much, but as part of a larger Indian Muslim community their voice would be heard.

 Finally, His Holiness noted that although they had invited him to lunch, on this occasion his hosts would not be joining him because they are observing the Ramadan daytime fast. They parted in good will with much affection and intentions to communicate messages of compassion and reconciliation to the world.  

3. ISIS (ISIL) BEFORE AND AFTER ENTERING IRAQ

View as ISIS entered Iraq. They drove across the country, coming into towns, waving flags, cheering, firing their weapons into the air. It appeared like a sports event. Then they hit poorly guarded towns and villages, shooting their way in, then kidnapping women and children, raping, and stealing. Beheading children, wives and husbands. With their new pick ups, they were relentless, filled with bravado.

View of their new pickup after ISIS entered Iraq. These "brave" soldiers died, trying to hide under a tree. Their black flag and guns destroyed.  "Those who live by the sword will die by the sword". 

Ferguson is burning, I stand with the people. Never again.

I stand in protest with the people of Ferguson for Justice, and wish these protests become a catalyst to eradicate the evil of racism from our society. Let’s be clear the bad guys are one or two to a million good police officers we have, but their actions create despair and trust issues in public safety and we must punish the bad guys to the maximum our law allows, no one should dare do this again. I pray for a safe America for every resident, and no one should live in fear of the other. Never again



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Mike Ghouse is a public speaker, thinker, writer and a commentator on Pluralism at work place, politics, religion, society, gender, race, culture, ethnicity, food and foreign policy. All about him is listed in several links at www.MikeGhouse.net and his writings are at www.TheGhousediary.com and 10 other blogs. He is committed to building cohesive societies and offers pluralistic solutions on issues of the day.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Desmond Tutu to the people of Israel: Liberate yourselves by liberating Palestine

The truth is one, no matter where it comes from or who says it.  I could not believe my eyes, when I read this appeal by Bishop Desmond Tutu.  So many sentences, thoughts and paragraphs are identical  in the following pieces I wrote a few weeks ago (after the appeal) - Mike Ghouse

Desmond Tutu to the people of Israel: Liberate yourselves by liberating Palestine

 http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/1.610687

Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, in an exclusive article for Haaretz, calls for a global boycott of Israel and urges Israelis and Palestinians to look beyond their leaders for a sustainable solution to the crisis in the Holy Land.

The past weeks have witnessed unprecedented action by members of civil society across the world against the injustice of Israel’s disproportionately brutal response to the firing of missiles from Palestine.

If you add together all the people who gathered over the past weekend to demand justice in Israel and Palestine – in Cape Town, Washington, D.C., New York, New Delhi, London, Dublin and Sydney, and all the other cities – this was arguably the largest active outcry by citizens around a single cause ever in the history of the world.

A quarter of a century ago, I participated in some well-attended demonstrations against apartheid. I never imagined we’d see demonstrations of that size again, but last Saturday’s turnout in Cape Town was as big if not bigger. Participants included young and old, Muslims, Christians, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists, agnostics, atheists, blacks, whites, reds and greens ... as one would expect from a vibrant, tolerant, multicultural nation.
I asked the crowd to chant with me: “We are opposed to the injustice of the illegal occupation of Palestine. We are opposed to the indiscriminate killing in Gaza. We are opposed to the indignity meted out to Palestinians at checkpoints and roadblocks. We are opposed to violence perpetrated by all parties. But we are not opposed to Jews.”

Earlier in the week, I called for the suspension of Israel from the International Union of Architects, which was meeting in South Africa.
 
I appealed to Israeli sisters and brothers present at the conference to actively disassociate themselves and their profession from the design and construction of infrastructure related to perpetuating injustice, including the separation barrier, the security terminals and checkpoints, and the settlements built on occupied Palestinian land. 

“I implore you to take this message home: Please turn the tide against violence and hatred by joining the nonviolent movement for justice for all people of the region,” I said. 

Over the past few weeks, more than 1.6 million people across the world have signed onto this movement by joining an Avaaz campaign calling on corporations profiting from the Israeli occupation and/or implicated in the abuse and repression of Palestinians to pull out. The campaign specifically targets Dutch pension fund ABP; Barclays Bank; security systems supplier G4S; French transport company Veolia; computer company Hewlett-Packard; and bulldozer supplier Caterpillar. 

Last month, 17 EU governments urged their citizens to avoid doing business in or investing in illegal Israeli settlements. 

The past weeks have witnessed unprecedented action by members of civil society across the world against the injustice of Israel’s disproportionately brutal response to the firing of missiles from Palestine. 

If you add together all the people who gathered over the past weekend to demand justice in Israel and Palestine – in Cape Town, Washington, D.C., New York, New Delhi, London, Dublin and Sydney, and all the other cities – this was arguably the largest active outcry by citizens around a single cause ever in the history of the world. 

A quarter of a century ago, I participated in some well-attended demonstrations against apartheid. I never imagined we’d see demonstrations of that size again, but last Saturday’s turnout in Cape Town was as big if not bigger. Participants included young and old, Muslims, Christians, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists, agnostics, atheists, blacks, whites, reds and greens ... as one would expect from a vibrant, tolerant, multicultural nation.
I asked the crowd to chant with me: “We are opposed to the injustice of the illegal occupation of Palestine. We are opposed to the indiscriminate killing in Gaza. We are opposed to the indignity meted out to Palestinians at checkpoints and roadblocks. We are opposed to violence perpetrated by all parties. But we are not opposed to Jews.” 

Earlier in the week, I called for the suspension of Israel from the International Union of Architects, which was meeting in South Africa. 
 
I appealed to Israeli sisters and brothers present at the conference to actively disassociate themselves and their profession from the design and construction of infrastructure related to perpetuating injustice, including the separation barrier, the security terminals and checkpoints, and the settlements built on occupied Palestinian land. 

“I implore you to take this message home: Please turn the tide against violence and hatred by joining the nonviolent movement for justice for all people of the region,” I said. 

Over the past few weeks, more than 1.6 million people across the world have signed onto this movement by joining an Avaaz campaign calling on corporations profiting from the Israeli occupation and/or implicated in the abuse and repression of Palestinians to pull out. The campaign specifically targets Dutch pension fund ABP; Barclays Bank; security systems supplier G4S; French transport company Veolia; computer company Hewlett-Packard; and bulldozer supplier Caterpillar. 

Last month, 17 EU governments urged their citizens to avoid doing business in or investing in illegal Israeli settlements.

But what ultimately forced these leaders together around the negotiating table was the cocktail of persuasive, nonviolent tools that had been developed to isolate South Africa, economically, academically, culturally and psychologically. 

At a certain point – the tipping point – the then-government realized that the cost of attempting to preserve apartheid outweighed the benefits. 

The withdrawal of trade with South Africa by multinational corporations with a conscience in the 1980s was ultimately one of the key levers that brought the apartheid state – bloodlessly – to its knees. Those corporations understood that by contributing to South Africa’s economy, they were contributing to the retention of an unjust status quo. 

Those who continue to do business with Israel, who contribute to a sense of “normalcy” in Israeli society, are doing the people of Israel and Palestine a disservice. They are contributing to the perpetuation of a profoundly unjust status quo. 

Those who contribute to Israel’s temporary isolation are saying that Israelis and Palestinians are equally entitled to dignity and peace.
Ultimately, events in Gaza over the past month or so are going to test who believes in the worth of human beings. 

It is becoming more and more clear that politicians and diplomats are failing to come up with answers, and that responsibility for brokering a sustainable solution to the crisis in the Holy Land rests with civil society and the people of Israel and Palestine themselves.

Besides the recent devastation of Gaza, decent human beings everywhere – including many in Israel – are profoundly disturbed by the daily violations of human dignity and freedom of movement Palestinians are subjected to at checkpoints and roadblocks. And Israel’s policies of illegal occupation and the construction of buffer-zone settlements on occupied land compound the difficulty of achieving an agreementsettlement in the future that is acceptable for all. 

The State of Israel is behaving as if there is no tomorrow. Its people will not live the peaceful and secure lives they crave – and are entitled to – as long as their leaders perpetuate conditions that sustain the conflict.
I have condemned those in Palestine responsible for firing missiles and rockets at Israel. They are fanning the flames of hatred. I am opposed to all manifestations of violence. 

But we must be very clear that the people of Palestine have every right to struggle for their dignity and freedom. It is a struggle that has the support of many around the world. 

No human-made problems are intractable when humans put their heads together with the earnest desire to overcome them. No peace is impossible when people are determined to achieve it. 

Peace requires the people of Israel and Palestine to recognize the human being in themselves and each other; to understand their interdependence. 

Missiles, bombs and crude invective are not part of the solution. There is no military solution. 

The solution is more likely to come from that nonviolent toolbox we developed in South Africa in the 1980s, to persuade the government of the necessity of altering its policies. 

The reason these tools – boycott, sanctions and divestment – ultimately proved effective was because they had a critical mass of support, both inside and outside the country. The kind of support we have witnessed across the world in recent weeks, in respect of Palestine. 

My plea to the people of Israel is to see beyond the moment, to see beyond the anger at feeling perpetually under siege, to see a world in which Israel and Palestine can coexist – a world in which mutual dignity and respect reign. 

It requires a mind-set shift. A mind-set shift that recognizes that attempting to perpetuate the current status quo is to damn future generations to violence and insecurity. A mind-set shift that stops regarding legitimate criticism of a state’s policies as an attack on Judaism. A mind-set shift that begins at home and ripples out across communities and nations and regions – to the Diaspora scattered across the world we share. The only world we share. 

People united in pursuit of a righteous cause are unstoppable. God does not interfere in the affairs of people, hoping we will grow and learn through resolving our difficulties and differences ourselves. But God is not asleep. The Jewish scriptures tell us that God is biased on the side of the weak, the dispossessed, the widow, the orphan, the alien who set slaves free on an exodus to a Promised Land. It was the prophet Amos who said we should let righteousness flow like a river. 

Goodness prevails in the end. The pursuit of freedom for the people of Palestine from humiliation and persecution by the policies of Israel is a righteous cause. It is a cause that the people of Israel should support. 

Nelson Mandela famously said that South Africans would not feel free until Palestinians were free.
He might have added that the liberation of Palestine will liberate Israel, too.

# # #
Do we fault Religion or the individual for the Gaza Crisis?
http://thearabdailynews.com/2014/08/06/fault-religion-individual-gaza-crisis/


Sanity Prayers for Jewish and Muslim Americans
http://foundationforpluralism.blogspot.com/2014/08/sanity-prayers-for-american-jews-and.html


Israel Palestine: Call for Accountability for the massacre of 1900 Civilians
http://thearabdailynews.com/2014/08/07/holding-obama-netanyahu-mashaal-accountable-massacres/ 


 Light a candle
http://israel-palestine-dialogue.blogspot.com/2014/08/light-candle-and-light-spirituality-in.html


White House petition
http://wh.gov/luT9U 


Mike Ghouse
www.MikeGhouse.net 

Monday, August 18, 2014

Ahmadis on the run: Fearing death in People's Colony

Time for Nawaz Shariff has come to and end,  his lawless government needs to go. The man is incapable of stopping cold blooded murders who are walking freely and killing anyone they don't like. There is not accountability of any kind. 
 
Those who go on a killing spree must be given a choice to cut the crap or face punishment,  I am a pacifist and don't believe in killing any, but if we don't stop these murderers, they will not stop killing others. I am talking about specific individuals and not any one associated with those evil men.

Minorities are not safe in Pakistan, the least American Pakistanis can do is to speak up.


Mike Ghouse



Ahmadis on the run: Fearing death in People's Colony
BY MIRZA IQBAL

http://www.dawn.com/news/1123873/


GUJRANWALA: A pall of fear hangs thick over Gujranwala’s now eerily silent People’s Colony. It has been weeks since an enraged mob set fire to five homes belonging to members of the Ahmadi community, resulting in the deaths of two girls and an elderly woman.

Since the ill-fated Sunday when the incident came to light, police officials have sealed several homes in the area and warily patrol the locality lest a similar episode erupts.
 

Policemen are deployed outside the torched homes of Ahmadis living in People's Colony
Photo shows a padlocked gate at the home of one People's Colony resident
Police have sealed off 11 homes belonging to members of the Ahmadi community

Like many stories that pertain to the persecuted community, it is difficult to find people who will speak to journalists without requesting anonymity.

It is no different in People’s Colony, where terrified residents from the community are desperate for their plight to come to a logical end, but afraid to be named for fear of being persecuted further.

Only the dead are identified, because they no longer have to live in fear.
Photo shows a house blackened by flames

Residents say they cannot return to their homes, and are too afraid to expose themselves for fear of being targeted by fanatics.

A 50-year-old resident on condition of anonymity told Dawn that he saved 13 members of the Ahmadi community when the rioters set homes ablaze on July 27.

“I helped them escape from the burning houses to a safe rooftop during the riot,” he said. “If I had not saved them, it would been difficult to protect them from the rioting mob.”

The biggest victim of this tragedy is Boota, an Ahmadi man who lost his mother Bashiran Bibi and young daughters Kainat and Hira. His pregnant sister who was visiting from the nearby village of Talwandi Musa Khan for Eid holidays lost her baby in the chaos and fumes during the riot.

According to a spokesperson of the local Ahmadi community, Boota is in hiding, for fear that he will meet the same fate as his family members.


A sign posted outside the home of Ahmadi community member, Boota, who has now gone into hiding
Children stand in in the People's Colony, where an angry mob burnt down the homes of five members of the Ahmadi community

Boota's neighbour Saleem and contractor Javed say the rioters were not from their neighbourhood. “We do not know where so many people came from,” they said, lamenting the loss of innocent lives.

They also said that Boota’s family had good relations with everyone in the vicinity, and there was no friction when it came to religion. They lived “peacefully”, one resident said.

It all started, he continued, when a member of the Ahmadi community posted an "offensive" image on Facebook, which angered some residents of the area.

According to relatives, 18-year-old A* shared the image on Facebook with his friends on July 20. When news of this allegedly blasphemous photo spread, some residents communicated their anger to the boy. Residents say A soon admitted to posting the image.

The news spread like wildfire.

That is when the mob showed up and over the span of a few short hours, stormed and torched five of the 11 homes belonging to members of the Ahmadi community.

Police officials said a case was later registered by Boota against the rioters and a joint investigation team monitored by a senior superintendent probed the incident. Over a hundred “unidentified people” and six nominated persons were booked under terrorism and murder laws but no arrests were made.

A police official said a separate case had been registered against A and his friends for blasphemy.

He also said that the station house officer (SHO) of People’s Colony was suspended for his delayed reaction to the riot and the fire which resulted in the deaths. A show-cause notice was also reportedly served to the district superintendent police.
Finding safer ground

Religious differences are not uncommon in Gujranwala. According to Amnesty International, a man called Hafiz Farooq Sajjad was stoned to death by an angry mob there in April 1994 over the alleged burning of a copy of the Holy Quran at his residence.

In the same city, former Punjab minister for social welfare Zille Huma Usman was shot dead in February 2007 by a man described by the police as a religious fanatic when she was going to address an open court over her “non-Islamic dress”.
Photo shows residents of People's Colony

Several Ahmadi families have moved out of Pakistan since 1974 which was when the country declared the community non-Muslim. But the group has become particularly vulnerable since 1984, when Pakistan passed laws forbidding them from saying or doing anything associated with Islam.

The Baltimore President of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Faheem Younus, says incidents like the People’s Colony attack force Ahmadis to leave Pakistan for safer ground.

“Whoever has the means to leave, finds it difficult to stay in Pakistan,” Younus tells Dawn.
Photo shows a blackened motor in People's Colony

In Pakistan, the Ahmadi question has also been about competition for economic and political power.

Younus says that “Ahmadis are worried about being used as scapegoats. Success for them has become a factor fraught with risks”.

He narrates the story of a relative who ran a successful business with franchises in Lahore, Karachi and Islamabad but was threatened to “back off”.

“Competitors openly threatened that they will falsely accuse him of blasphemy if he didn't cave in to their demands. He resisted for a couple of years. But then one of his own employees called a local maulvi, accusing that my relative offered congregational prayers at work [in Islamabad]. Two men came with guns, searching for him in his office. He left for Canada within months. Over 50 of his employees lost their jobs because be had to close the business.”

According to Younus, there are many tragic stories, “but there are also many Ahmadis who I know have the means, have the visas, but don't leave, can't leave either because of their love for the country or because they feel guilty leaving the rest of their family in Pakistan.”

He recalls that he was 13 years of age when the blasphemy laws were enacted.

“I'll never forget the look on my late father's face the day [the laws were enacted]. He said, you will see this will start with us [Ahmadis] but will end with the country's end.”

Saturday, August 16, 2014

The Life of a Kashmiri Woman, a book by Dr. Nyla Ali Khan

URL - http://worldmuslimcongress.blogspot.com/2014/08/the-life-of-kashmiri-woman-book-by-dr.html

Women shape and define the cultures. Although Islam had liberated women to be the master of her their own destinies some 1400 years ago, the culture of men had kept them from contributing to the development of societies.  Much of the re-liberation of women’s right started materializing in the 60’s, and every now and then, there were amazing women who have shaped the societies despite the odds against them.  We recently highlighted Malala, and now Dr. Nyla Ali Khan highlights yet another woman has done so much; Akbar Jehan, wife of Hon. Sheikh Abdullah, the First head of the state of Kashmir.


One of the reviews reads, “Akbar Jehan’s work on the legal, social, and economic status of women in Jammu and Kashmir is commendable. She was a passionate advocate of women’s education who sought to place girls—including those of impoverished backgrounds—in the modern and vibrant world of intellectual and scientific pursuits. Working with Lady Mountbatten, wife of the first Governor General of post-Partition India, Lord Mountbatten, Akbar Jehan advocated for repatriating young women who had been forcibly removed from their families during the partition of the country.”

Mike Ghouse, a speaker thinker and a writer committed to building cohesive societies and offers pluralistic solutions on issues of the day. More at www.MikeGhouse.net

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The Life of a Kashmiri Woman
Dialectic of Resistance and Accommodation

Nyla Ali Khan's subject, Akbar Jehan, was a political activist and the wife of Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah, Kashmiri nationalist and first Muslim Prime Minister of the disputed state of Jammu and Kashmir. The author employs oral testimonies and relies on written resources to add layers of understanding to the events that shaped the history of Kashmir. In this hybrid of memoir and auto/ biography, the author has also interspersed her memories with descriptions of historical and political events in which Akbar Jehan and her husband were principal political players.

By Nyla Ali Khan


To analyze the personal, political, and intellectual trajectory of Akbar Jehan—the woman, the wife, the mother, and the Kashmiri nationalist, not simply an iconic and often misunderstood political figure—has been an emotionally tempestuous journey for me. The Kashmiri political and social activist is my maternal grandmother. I am so interested in studying her life and work because, to my mind, there is a historical value in challenging the historical narratives about the political actors of pre-and post-1947 Jammu and Kashmir and the movement for an autonomous and pluralistic Kashmir. I have attempted to steer clear of delimiting and constricting narratives about her life and work in my recent book. It is important to reshape the collective historical memory so that it includes the humanitarian and pluralistic endeavors of leaders of the movement at that critical time after the partition of India. While teaching classes on Women’s and Gender Studies at the Universities of Nebraska and Oklahoma, I realized that history has done a rather inadequate job of memorializing the contributions of women political and social activists. Akbar Jehan’s work of sustaining the community, caring for the marginalized and disempowered at a turbulent time, has not been captured by professional historians, who have peripheralized the work of women in rebuilding societies following armed conflict. With the oral and historical resources available to me, I investigated the impact of Akbar Jehan’s work on the legal, social, and economic status of women in Jammu and Kashmir. She was a passionate advocate of women’s education who sought to place girls—including those of impoverished backgrounds—in the modern and vibrant world of intellectual and scientific pursuits. Working with Lady Mountbatten, wife of the first Governor General of post-Partition India, Lord Mountbatten, Akbar Jehan advocated for repatriating young women who had been forcibly removed from their families during the partition of the country. According to my mother Suraiya and her older sister Khalida, Akbar Jehan also worked to restore the honor of those women who had borne the brunt of communal vendetta. Following the partition, she helped to form the Relief Committee and served on the chair of the Food Committee, which sought to address economic losses resulting from the collapse of the tourism sector and the subsequent rise in the cost of living. Later, Akbar Jehan founded the institute Markaz Behbudi Khawateen, still in operation today, which imparts literacy, training in arts and crafts, health care, and social security as tools of empowerment. All of these efforts constitute a powerful rebuttal of the tendency among Western observers to conflate Islamic norms with practices. Western feminist epistemologies in particular, as I have observed in Islam, Women, and the Violence in Kashmir, can impair the research paradigms, hypotheses, and field work on women in Islamic societies. Akbar Jehan believed that women citizens should be accorded equal rights with men in all fields of national life—economic, cultural, political, and in government services. She reinforced the idea that women should have the right to work in every line of employment for terms and wages equal to those for men; women would be assured of equality with men in education, social insurance and job conditions, though she argued that the law should also give special protections to mothers and children. In contrast to many Western feminists, however, Akbar Jehan gave equal credence to the path-paving work of women within religious, familial, and communal frameworks. Moreover, she sought to motivate education within minority communities (as opposed to state-controlled education), and above all she recognized culture and history as sites of political and social struggle. Akbar Jehan understood that reforms and consciousness-raising could occur most decisively at the grassroots level, not in the corridors of power in New Delhi, nor in the plush halls of parliament. I would venture to say that the many harangues, digressions, dogmatic statements, and red tape of parliament could not intimidate an activist who had worked in the trenches and walked shoulder to shoulder with the leaders of the anti-monarchical, anti-colonial, and Independence movements of the Indian subcontinent. Akbar Jehan was of the opinion that enfranchisement of both women and men, and assuring women of equal opportunities in education, are not empowering in themselves, but would cause a momentous shift in traditional gender relationships. To address these political obstacles, women who were active in politics in the 20th century sought not only to improve the position of their particular organizations but also to forge connections between the various women’s groups. One of their major accomplishments came in 1950, when the government of Jammu and Kashmir developed educational institutions for women on a large scale, including the first University, as well as a College for women. There remains much scholarly work to be done in exploring how women in civic associations and in government led the way toward a peaceful pluralistic democracy. By virtue of her status among the major Kashmiri institutions, Akbar Jehan earned the authority to make major policy decisions. Thus, she enjoyed a privilege that other intelligent visionary women did not have. For example, she represented Srinagar and Anantnag constituencies of Jammu and Kashmir in the Indian parliament from 1977 to 1979 and 1984 to 1989, respectively. Akbar Jehan was also the first president of the Jammu and Kashmir Red Cross Society from 1947 to 1951. She was the first lady of Jammu and Kashmir from 1948–1953 and again from 1975–1982. So, it would be difficult to deny that making one’s vision a reality, particularly for a woman in the South Asian context, is contingent, to a certain extent, on socioeconomic privilege and political clout. And though Akbar Jehan’s critics have pointed out that her elite position gave her visibility and access to the echelons of power, this by no means diminishes her legacy.

khanNyla Ali Khan is a faculty member at the University of Oklahoma and member of the Harvard-based Scholars Strategy Network. She is the author of The Fiction of Nationality in an Era of Transnationalism, Islam, Women, and Violence in Kashmir, and The Life of a Kashmiri Woman. She is also the editor of The Parchment of Kashmir, a contributor to The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Women (2013), and a guest editor for Oxford Islamic Studies Online.
Oxford Islamic Studies Online is an authoritative, dynamic resource that brings together the best current scholarship in the field for students, scholars, government officials, community groups, and librarians to foster a more accurate and informed understanding of the Islamic world. Oxford Islamic Studies Online features reference content and commentary by renowned scholars in areas such as global Islamic history, concepts, people, practices, politics, and culture, and is regularly updated as new content is commissioned and approved under the guidance of the Editor in Chief, John L. Esposito.
- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/07/akbar-jehan-dialectic-of-resistance-accommodation/#sthash.Tta6R6le.dpuf

By Nyla Ali Khan

To analyze the personal, political, and intellectual trajectory of Akbar Jehan—the woman, the wife, the mother, and the Kashmiri nationalist, not simply an iconic and often misunderstood political figure—has been an emotionally tempestuous journey for me. The Kashmiri political and social activist is my maternal grandmother. I am so interested in studying her life and work because, to my mind, there is a historical value in challenging the historical narratives about the political actors of pre-and post-1947 Jammu and Kashmir and the movement for an autonomous and pluralistic Kashmir. I have attempted to steer clear of delimiting and constricting narratives about her life and work in my recent book. It is important to reshape the collective historical memory so that it includes the humanitarian and pluralistic endeavors of leaders of the movement at that critical time after the partition of India.

While teaching classes on Women’s and Gender Studies at the Universities of Nebraska and Oklahoma, I realized that history has done a rather inadequate job of memorializing the contributions of women political and social activists. Akbar Jehan’s work of sustaining the community, caring for the marginalized and disempowered at a turbulent time, has not been captured by professional historians, who have peripheralized the work of women in rebuilding societies following armed conflict.

With the oral and historical resources available to me, I investigated the impact of Akbar Jehan’s work on the legal, social, and economic status of women in Jammu and Kashmir. She was a passionate advocate of women’s education who sought to place girls—including those of impoverished backgrounds—in the modern and vibrant world of intellectual and scientific pursuits. Working with Lady Mountbatten, wife of the first Governor General of post-Partition India, Lord Mountbatten, Akbar Jehan advocated for repatriating young women who had been forcibly removed from their families during the partition of the country. According to my mother Suraiya and her older sister Khalida, Akbar Jehan also worked to restore the honor of those women who had borne the brunt of communal vendetta. Following the partition, she helped to form the Relief Committee and served on the chair of the Food Committee, which sought to address economic losses resulting from the collapse of the tourism sector and the subsequent rise in the cost of living. Later, Akbar Jehan founded the institute Markaz Behbudi Khawateen, still in operation today, which imparts literacy, training in arts and crafts, health care, and social security as tools of empowerment.

All of these efforts constitute a powerful rebuttal of the tendency among Western observers to conflate Islamic norms with practices. Western feminist epistemologies in particular, as I have observed in Islam, Women, and the Violence in Kashmir, can impair the research paradigms, hypotheses, and field work on women in Islamic societies. Akbar Jehan believed that women citizens should be accorded equal rights with men in all fields of national life—economic, cultural, political, and in government services. She reinforced the idea that women should have the right to work in every line of employment for terms and wages equal to those for men; women would be assured of equality with men in education, social insurance and job conditions, though she argued that the law should also give special protections to mothers and children. In contrast to many Western feminists, however, Akbar Jehan gave equal credence to the path-paving work of women within religious, familial, and communal frameworks. Moreover, she sought to motivate education within minority communities (as opposed to state-controlled education), and above all she recognized culture and history as sites of political and social struggle.

Akbar Jehan understood that reforms and consciousness-raising could occur most decisively at the grassroots level, not in the corridors of power in New Delhi, nor in the plush halls of parliament. I would venture to say that the many harangues, digressions, dogmatic statements, and red tape of parliament could not intimidate an activist who had worked in the trenches and walked shoulder to shoulder with the leaders of the anti-monarchical, anti-colonial, and Independence movements of the Indian subcontinent. Akbar Jehan was of the opinion that enfranchisement of both women and men, and assuring women of equal opportunities in education, are not empowering in themselves, but would cause a momentous shift in traditional gender relationships. To address these political obstacles, women who were active in politics in the 20th century sought not only to improve the position of their particular organizations but also to forge connections between the various women’s groups. One of their major accomplishments came in 1950, when the government of Jammu and Kashmir developed educational institutions for women on a large scale, including the first University, as well as a College for women. There remains much scholarly work to be done in exploring how women in civic associations and in government led the way toward a peaceful pluralistic democracy.

By virtue of her status among the major Kashmiri institutions, Akbar Jehan earned the authority to make major policy decisions. Thus, she enjoyed a privilege that other intelligent visionary women did not have. For example, she represented Srinagar and Anantnag constituencies of Jammu and Kashmir in the Indian parliament from 1977 to 1979 and 1984 to 1989, respectively. Akbar Jehan was also the first president of the Jammu and Kashmir Red Cross Society from 1947 to 1951. She was the first lady of Jammu and Kashmir from 1948–1953 and again from 1975–1982. So, it would be difficult to deny that making one’s vision a reality, particularly for a woman in the South Asian context, is contingent, to a certain extent, on socioeconomic privilege and political clout. And though Akbar Jehan’s critics have pointed out that her elite position gave her visibility and access to the echelons of power, this by no means diminishes her legacy.

    khanNyla Ali Khan is a faculty member at the University of Oklahoma and member of the Harvard-based Scholars Strategy Network. She is the author of The Fiction of Nationality in an Era of Transnationalism, Islam, Women, and Violence in Kashmir, and The Life of a Kashmiri Woman. She is also the editor of The Parchment of Kashmir, a contributor to The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Women (2013), and a guest editor for Oxford Islamic Studies Online.

    Oxford Islamic Studies Online is an authoritative, dynamic resource that brings together the best current scholarship in the field for students, scholars, government officials, community groups, and librarians to foster a more accurate and informed understanding of the Islamic world. Oxford Islamic Studies Online features reference content and commentary by renowned scholars in areas such as global Islamic history, concepts, people, practices, politics, and culture, and is regularly updated as new content is commissioned and approved under the guidance of the Editor in Chief, John L. Esposito.

- See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/07/akbar-jehan-dialectic-of-resistance-accommodation/#sthash.Tta6R6le.dpuf

Book reviews:

"This penetrating biography of Begum Akbar Jehan Abdullah by her granddaughter Nyla Ali Khan stands at the intersection of feminist as well as postcolonial theory and history, taking a hybrid form of memoir, auto/biography, and history that allows the author to probe her own history and subjectivity in the context of familial and Kashmiri historical mileposts and unfolding political developments. With a perspective heightened by distance from her home country and a tone at times tinged with a nostalgia that she herself is wary of, the author paints a loving and personal picture of a powerful woman whose role and actions gave Kashmir a model for women's political action in the critical period before and after the partition of India in 1947." - Catherine Hobbs, Professor of English and Women's and Gender Studies, University of Oklahoma, USA

"Nyla Ali Khan presents a hybrid feminist memoir and auto/biography of her grandmother, Begum Akbar Jehan. Jehan was the wife of political advocate, socialist, and first prime minister of the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir, Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah. From a wealthy background, Jehan promoted the overlapping grassroots and nationalist interests of herself and her husband, placing emphasis on women's education. She was a pillar of stability for her husband, children and grandchildren and a representative of Jammu and Kashmir politics whether her husband was in or out of power." - Betty J. Harris, Professor of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, USA

Friday, August 15, 2014

Will your Mosque pray for the Oppressed?

WILL YOUR MOSQUE PRAY FOR THE OPPRESSED?

I have been on the phone, texts and emails with several Mosques, and thank God most of them will be praying for the safety of Christians, Yazidis and Shias…

Here is my offer, if your mosque does this, please send me a picture of your Imam and his or her team in front of the mosque, the name and address of the mosque, God willing, I will put a list together and publish it as a follow up, or just post it here. I will compile the list at World Muslim Congress.

The link to the article is at Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mike-ghouse/muslims-to-dedicate-frida_b_5679118.html

Thank you

 Mike Ghouse
 
Thank you
mike

Mike Ghouse

(214) 325-1916 text/talk
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Mike Ghouse is a public speaker, thinker, writer and a commentator on Pluralism at work place, politics, religion, society, gender, race, culture, ethnicity, food and foreign policy. All about him is listed in several links at www.MikeGhouse.net and his writings are at www.TheGhousediary.com and 10 other blogs. He is committed to building cohesive societies and offers pluralistic solutions on issues of the day.

Monday, August 11, 2014

Massacres of Christians, Yazidis and others in Iraq must stop now

MASSACRES OF CHRISTIANS, YAZIDIS, SHIA AND OTHER MINORITIES IN IRAQ MUST STOP NOW.

In behalf of World Muslim Congress; I strongly condemn the evil acts of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi for terrorizing Christians, Yazidis, Shia and other minorities in Iraq. He is an evil man and must be caught and processed for his crimes against humanity, there is Genocide in making, and I recommend a bounty be placed to get him dead or alive.

Christians are being chased out of Iraq, with the Gangster Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi giving a despicable ultimatum to the Christians, "We offer them three choices: Islam; the dhimma contract - involving payment of Jiziyah; if they refuse this they will have nothing but the sword."


Al-Baghdadi's gang is rogue, and villains of humanity and Islam. We can offer them to surrender or face the drones.


MikeGhouse@aol.com
(214) 325-1916 Text Messages
www.WorldMuslimCongress.com
www.FoundationforPluralism.com
.........................................................................................................................
Mike Ghouse is a public speaker, thinker, writer and a commentator on Pluralism at work place, politics, religion, society, gender, race, culture, ethnicity, food and foreign policy. All about him is listed in several links at www.MikeGhouse.net and his writings are at www.TheGhousediary.com and 10 other blogs. He is committed to building cohesive societies and offers pluralistic solutions on issues of the day.

Friday, August 8, 2014

Israel Palestine: Call for Accountability for the massacre of 1900 Civilians

PRESS RELEASE
Israel Palestine: Call for Accountability for the massacre of 1900 Civilians
Site: www.israelpalestinedialouge.com 
url - http://israel-palestine-dialogue.blogspot.com/2014/08/israel-palestine-call-for.html

Please sign the Petition urging White House to initiate an inquiry 
http://wh.gov/luT9U


We urge our governmental and humanitarian agencies to investigate and establish responsibilities for the death of 1900 civilians in the latest conflict. Through this we hope and pray for de-escalating the growing anti-Semitism and anti-Arab sentiments caused by the brutal but senseless killings in the conflict. Our ultimate goal is security for Israel and Justice for the Palestinians, one will not happen without the other.

Aug. 7, 2014 - DALLAS --
We are seriously concerned about the ongoing conflict between Israel and Palestine, and present the following proposal to bring some sense to the future of both societies, as all of them have to start living together some day,  and seeing eye to eye.  If they can mitigate the damage about to happen with the war of words, the better off they would be in facing each other tomorrow.

The immediate need is to de-escalate blaming and stereotyping that goes with a conflict. Judaism or Islam is not responsible for this mayhem, and neither Israel nor Palestine is responsible for this. If we blame these intangibles, we cannot restore law and order, as we cannot beat, kick, kill, shoot or bury these, nothing comes off blaming these.  We cannot put these intangibles on the stand in the court of law either.
We should guard ourselves from getting derailed from our goals by divisive rhetoric or reports. The bottom line is security for Israel and justice for the Palestinians so that Israelis and Palestinians can start living a normal life as normal people.
Blaming any group amounts to stereotyping, and will lead us nowhere, and it's an unhealthy thing to the future of both societies, as all of them have to start living together some day as normal people.
It is in the best interests of all to establish the responsibility of the crimes on to the individuals and hold them accountable.
A commission of inquiry needs to be set up, to clearly establish responsibility for the death of civilians, and take the necessary actions to hold the individuals accountable.  If Netanyahu, Mashaal, Obama, and the leadership in US Senate and Congress could have averted the deaths, why did they not do it? What prevented them from getting the parties to have a dialogue?
Societies functions effectively and cohesively, when there is law and order, individuals mess it up, and individuals need to be punished to restore it. Barking at intangibles like religion or nation is useless, although their scriptures require a better interpretation to fully respect the God given rights of every human being.
Individual lapses or deliberations are responsible for this mayhem, and certainly not Jews and Muslims. My father taught me, blaming the individual stops the fire from spreading to neighborhood, town, state and the nations.  As responsible citizens of the world, we need to take a step back, drop anti-Semitism and Anti-Palestinian stance and be the just people to produce just results and work on building cohesive societies, where no human has to live in fear of the other.
Contact Mike Ghouse (214) 325-1916 text/talk MikeGhouse@aol.com

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Islam is here to stay and Prophet will be there forever.

ISLAM IS HERE TO STAY | THE COVENANT INITIATIVE

www.WorldMuslimCongress.com - URL: http://worldmuslimcongress.blogspot.com/2014/08/islam-is-here-to-stay-and-prophet-will.html

Zoroaster, Abraham, Moses, Jacob, Krishna, Buddha, Mahavir, Jesus, Confucius, Muhammad and 124,000 other peacemakers have brought solid messages of peace, and help build cohesive societies where no human had to live in fear of the other. Let me caution you, their followers have interpreted the inclusive messages to suit their exclusive needs.

The need of the day is a test - if a verse from any one of these books promotes and encourages hate - we have two options; 1) Keep reading the verse and its context until you get the full meaning of it, and usually it is inclusive of humanity - a good suggestion from Karen Armstrong and 2) You don't have to buy what is dished out even by some great men in the past. After all if you are anguished about an issue, it is you, and not them that feels the pain.

A year ago, I wrote, "Criticism of Islam, Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) and free speech" and it has become a widely read and quoted article. http://worldmuslimcongress.blogspot.com/2012/11/criticism-of-islam-prophet-muhammad.html 

And now, I ran into a note from one of my friends that I have come to admire for his scholarly work and we have jointly written a few articles.

Islam is here to stay


by Muhammad Yunus

When Islam was hardly a decade into revelation, the detractors of Muhammad called him impostor (30:58), insane (44:1, 68:51), and an insane poet (37:36), and ridiculed the Qur’anic revelation (18:56, 26:6, 37:14, 45:9). They  found the revelation strange and unbelievable (38:5, 50:2), and condemned it as the legends of the ancients (6:25, 23:83, 27:68, 46:17, 68:15, 83:13). They  questioned why Muhammad could not show any miracles (6:37, 11:12, 13:7, 17:90-93, 21:5, 25:7/8, 29:50), and why the Qur'an was not revealed to a man of importance from the two cities (43:31) and declared that other people coached Muhammad or dictated to him morning and evening (25:5, 44:14). They also charged him with forging lies and witchcraft (34:43, 38:4), forging lies against God, forgery and making up tales (11:13, 32:3, 38:7, 46:8), witchcraft (21:3, 43:30, 74:24), obvious witchcraft that was bewildering (10:2, 37:15, 46:7) and of being bewitched or possessed by a Jinn (17:47, 23:70, 34:8).
Muhammad (Peace be upon him) then had barely a hundred followers.
Today Islam has crossed its 140th decade and Muhammad has a billion and a half followers, the diatribes and calumnies of a few scores or hundreds or thousands or millions of its detractors will not be able to stem its tide.
Read the following authentic and alarming material straight from the global media, should you have any doubt:
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The Covenants Initiative: A Call for Peace and a Token of Hope

· by drjamorrow · Bookmark the permalink. ·

The following is from the author, John Andrew Morrow, addressed primarily to his fellow Muslims, and thus it employs direct language appropriate for such. We realize that not all Angelico readers will agree with all of John’s statements, but we offer this in the hope of making more people aware of the persecution of Christians around the world, encouraging the condemnation of these acts, and furthering peaceful Muslim/Christian relations.

By Dr. John Andrew Morrow
As the Middle East, North Africa, Western Africa, and other parts of the world continue their descent into Dante’s Inferno, spiraling down a whirlpool of hatred, violence, and intolerance, no true Muslim can remain mute. As Ginetta Sagan once said, “Silence in the face of injustice is complicity with the oppressor.”
This is particularly the case when those who are perpetrating atrocities against Christians profess to follow the Prophet Muhammad, a merciful and compassionate man who commanded all Muslims to protect peaceful Christians “until the Hour comes and the world ends.” As Muslims, all acts of terrorism, oppression, and injustice, committed in the name of the Messenger of Allah are profoundly injurious irrespective of whether the guilty parties are merely misguided Muslims, infidel heretics, or agents of foreign intelligence services.
Following the example of the Prophet Muhammad, who taught us that “The best jihad is the word of justice in front of an oppressive ruler” (related on the authority of Abu Dawud, Tirmidhi, and Ibn Majah), we have commenced what is called “The Covenants Initiative,” a movement which calls upon all Muslims to abide by the covenants that the Messenger of Allah concluded with the friendly Christian communities of his time and which he stated were binding until the Day of Judgment.
“How can this possibly help,” some will ask. “How can it possibly hurt” is the most adequate response. As we read in the Holy Qur’an: “Indeed, Allah will not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves” (13:11). Consequently, we must adopt a bottom-up approach and create an ambitious grass-roots movement aimed at inculcating a correct comprehension of Islam, particularly with regards to relations to minorities and members of other religions.
As the Covenants of the Prophet Muhammad make abundantly clear, tolerance, mercy, respect, forgiveness, compassion, and love are at the heart of the Islamic message. As Almighty Allah states in the Holy Qur’an, Muhammad was sent as a mercy to the world (21:107). However, when one glances at the Muslim world today, one gets the impression that some Muslims were sent as a scourge to the world. It is true, and must never be forgotten, that the vast majority of Muslims are peaceful, law-abiding citizens, with sound morals and ethics. This does not exclude the fact that a minority of Muslims have been seduced, deluded, and brainwashed into becoming modern-day Kharijites, brutal, psychotic fanatics, who were excommunicated from the body of Islam by the Messenger of Allah himself.
These pseudo-Sunni Takfiri terrorists profess to practice the jihad of the sword, while violating all of its rules, when the Prophet taught us that the greatest jihad was that of spiritual struggle and social activism as well as scholarship and science. They claim to be Muslim, from the Arabic root SLM which means submission and peace, when they are not at peace with anyone. In reality, the Takfiris follow the religion of hatred and violence when traditional Muslims follow the religion, not of strict pacifism, but of love, peace, and justice. When forced to fight, in war of self-defense, they always adhere to Islamic norms of conduct and never engage in wars of aggression for, as the Holy Qur’an expresses, “Allah loves not the corrupters” (28:77) and “Allah loves not the aggressors” (2:190).
It is to defend the dignity and integrity of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him, that we promote the Covenants Initiative, a simple statement with potentially revolutionary consequences. Our goal is to educate, enlighten, and inspire. Our aim is to galvanize Muslims around the Qur’an and the Covenants of the Prophet, primordial pacts of protection which are truly a condensation of the authentic Sunnah. There are those who wish to exploit Islam for purposes of unjust war and there are people like us who faithfully follow Islam in the struggle to establish peace.
“Blessed be the peace makers” (Matthew 5:9) said Jesus, the Messiah, son of Mary, and, as the Covenants of the Prophet Muhammad make manifest, the Messenger of Allah was the greatest of peace makers, a man with a mission to apply both spiritual and material power to bring peace and harmony to the planet as a whole. And Allah guides whom He wills (2:272).
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